Activists Gather in Colorado for Mountain Hours Alternative Currency Event

Sharlene with activist Luke Rudkowski at Wayne Walton's Mountain Hours event in Breckinridge.
Sharlene with activist Luke Rudkowski at Wayne Walton's Mountain Hours event in Breckinridge.
We are Change Colorado activists at Wayne Walton's Mountain Hours Conference 2012, in Breckinridge, Colorado.
We are Change Colorado activists at Wayne Walton’s Mountain Hours Conference 2012, in Breckinridge, Colorado.

Vengeancia (updated May 16, 2014) I had a great time hangin’ this 4th of July weekend and celebrating our independence from the Federal Reserve’s usurous banksters along with fellow activists & musicians Luke Rudkowski, Adam Kokesh, Joby Weeks, Wayne Walton, Sheriff Richard Mack, Law Johnston, Wandering Monks, Jordan Page, Gary Franchi, David Justice, Tisha Casida and many many others at the Rocky Mountain Peace Unity and Freedom Festival here in Breckinridge.

Currency Creators Wayne Walton and Joby Weeks
In Bernanke’s Face: Currency Creators Wayne Walton and Joby Weeks

We, the people ARE the money. We are the currency creators. You can learn more about local-acting currencies and how you can start your own in your own community from Mike Storm and Wayne Walton; they used to have a show on Revolution Radio and Republic Broadcasting Network. Find out how you can benefit from using MTN Hours at mtnhours!!

Sheriff Richard Mack also attended the event. His CSPOA project will be holding their 2nd national convention in September. He told a story about Rosa Parks and civil disobedience.

Midway through Mack’s presentation, activist, musician and author, Stephen Gladstone, interrupted Sheriff Mack to raise his concerns about the infiltration of freemasonry to co-opt the freedom movement. Mack reassured the audience that he’s “not a freemason!” Learn more about restoring people’s Rights and restoring the republican form of government promised to Americans by the Constitution at USA vs US.

According to Wikipedia, after working all day, Rosa Parks boarded the Cleveland Avenue bus at around 6 p.m., Thursday, December 1, 1955, in downtown Montgomery. She paid her fare and sat in an empty seat in the first row of back seats reserved for blacks in the “colored” section. It was near the middle of the bus and directly behind the ten seats reserved for white passengers…

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks

As the bus traveled along its regular route, all of the white-only seats in the bus filled up. The bus reached the third stop in front of the Empire Theater, and several white passengers boarded. Following prevailing practice, Blake noted that the front of the bus was filled with white passengers, with two or three standing. He moved the “colored” section sign behind Parks and demanded that four black people give up their seats in the middle section so that the white passengers could sit.

Years later, in recalling the events of the day, Parks said, “When that white driver stepped back toward us, when he waved his hand and ordered us up and out of our seats, I felt a determination cover my body like a quilt on a winter night.”

By Parks’ account, Blake said, “Y’all better make it light on yourselves and let me have those seats.”

Three of them complied. Parks said, “The driver wanted us to stand up, the four of us. We didn’t move at the beginning, but he says, ‘Let me have these seats.’ And the other three people moved, but I didn’t.”

The black man sitting next to her gave up his seat.

Americans, just like Alice in Wonderland, have gone "Through the Looking Glass!"
Americans, just like Alice in Wonderland, have gone “Through the Looking Glass!”

Parks moved, but toward the window seat; she did not get up to move to the newly repositioned colored section.

Gary Franchi (L), Richard Mack, and Adam Kokesh in Breckinridge
Gary Franchi (L), Richard Mack, and Adam Kokesh in Breckinridge
Law Johnston, Shar aka VenGeancia, and Luke Rudkowski
Law Johnston, Shar aka VenGeancia, and Luke Rudkowski

Blake said, “Why don’t you stand up?” Parks responded, “I don’t think I should have to stand up.” Blake called the police to arrest Parks. When recalling the incident for Eyes on the Prize, a 1987 public television series on the Civil Rights Movement, Parks said, “When he saw me still sitting, he asked if I was going to stand up, and I said, ‘No, I’m not.’ And he said, ‘Well, if you don’t stand up, I’m going to have to call the police and have you arrested.’ I said, ‘You may do that.’ ”

During a 1956 radio interview with Sydney Rogers in West Oakland several months after her arrest, when asked about her decision, Parks said, “I would have to know for once and for all what rights I had as a human being and a citizen.”

She also described her motivation in her autobiography, My Story:

“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. I was not old, although some people have an image of me as being old then. I was forty-two. No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in…”

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